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Mar 2, 2022 Read in Browser

Karuna News

“From caring comes courage.” —Lao Tzu
 

Greetings! This week’s stories exemplify the courage to confront pain, danger and uncertainty and the willingness to make a difference. A father trusts a total stranger to bring his children to safety, a woman shares a message of hope to those in need and a company bravely tries something unusual and discovers a new way to support the environment. At the core of who we are, as human beings, is a deep caring for each other and a courageous kindness that uplifts us all.  May these stories brighten and lift your day!

NEWS

Volunteers Extend Help To Thousands Of Refugees From Ukraine

Volunteers Extend Help To Thousands Of Refugees From Ukraine

Ray Sangga Kusuma | Unsplash

The U.N. Refugee Agency estimates that 368,000 refugees have fled the Ukraine since Russia attacked the country last Thursday. These refugees are arriving in bordering nations like Romania, Poland, Hungary, Moldova, and Slovakia. Amid the horrors and chaos, volunteers from far and wide are showing support by extending help to those whose lives are being shattered by the war. At Romania's Siret border crossing, where thousands of Ukrainians have entered, government workers race to distribute basic amenities donated from all across the country. Meanwhile, people and businesses are pooling resources to provide the refugees with everything they need. A businessman who lives in Suceava, about 50 kilometers (30 miles) south of the Siret border crossing, has converted a large ballroom at the hotel he owns into a refugee reception center and is offering free hotel rooms to the displaced. "I feel the need to help. It's my duty to help. I have locals who speak Ukrainian we are united to help them," said Stefan Mandachi, the hotel owner, who also owns a fast- food chain and is offering free food to the refugees. Read Full Story.

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EVERYDAY HEROES

At The Ukrainian Border, A Mother Brings A Stranger's Children To Safety

At The Ukrainian Border, A Mother Brings A Stranger's Children To Safety

Anna Semyuk, 33, hugs her son at the Beregsurany border crossing, Hungary, February 26, 2022. Bernadett Szabo | Reuters

Clutching a mobile phone number of a woman she had never met, Nataliya Ableyeva crossed the border from Ukraine into Hungary on Saturday, entrusted with precious cargo. While waiting at the border crossing, Ableyeva had met a desperate 38-year-old man from her hometown with his young son and daughter. The border guards would not let him cross and he needed to get his children to safety. "Their father simply handed over the two kids to me, and trusted me, giving me their passports to bring them over," she said. The children's Ukrainian mother, Anna Semyuk, was on her way from Italy to meet them and take them to safety, the father said. Ableyeva took the children by hand and together they crossed the border. On the Hungarian side, they waited for the children's mother. The little boy was crying when his mobile phone rang. It was his mother, she was nearly at the border post. After arriving, the children's mother, Semyuk, hugged her son and daughter and bundled them into the car. Then she thanked and embraced Abelyeva and they started to cry. "All I can say now, is that everything will be alright" said the exhausted and relieved mother. Read Full Story.

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INSPIRATION

A Homemade Bumper Sticker Saved A Stranger's Life After She Asked The Universe For 'a Sign'

A Homemade Bumper Sticker Saved A Stranger's Life After She Asked The Universe For 'a Sign'

Brooke Lacey, a 22-year-old university student, had suffered her own share of issues. She had won her battle against depression and, in the hope of helping others, the New Zealand native was inspired to create a batch of 600 signs that read, "Please don't take your life today. The world is so much better with you in it. More than you realize, stay." Lacey hung laminated versions of the message on bridges and overpasses, and next to railroads and waterways around the capital city of Wellington. She even had the saying inscribed on a bumper sticker. Recently, Lacey found a handwritten note on the windshield of her car. The unsigned note read, "I left my house with a plan and asked for a sign, any sign, I was doing the right thing when I saw your car in the parking lot. Thank you." It took Lacey a little while to connect the note to her bumper sticker she'd made up so long ago. This story is a reminder that the smallest mindful act of kindness can turn out to be the light at the end of the tunnel for someone else. Read Full Story.

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RESOURCES

This Highway Offers A Unique Solution To Diaper Disposal

This Highway Offers A Unique Solution To Diaper Disposal

Karolina Grabowska | Pexels

Wales' diaper road is a unique pilot project that could not only reduce landfill waste, but influence parents who are weighing cloth vs. disposable diapers. The diapers were rinsed, shredded into fibrous gray pellets, mixed with asphalt and slathered over a 1.5-mile stretch of highway. Ben Lake, who represents the area in Britain's Parliament, says it "could be a game-changer for how we approach infrastructure in Wales," while helping to tackle the "here and now" problem of 140 million discarded disposable diapers annually. NappiCycle, which supplied the pellets, recycles about 40 million diapers a year and has used them to make construction panels, pinup boards and coasters. While some areas in Wales ask households using disposable diapers to set them out in a separate bin for collection each week, it is cheaper for local authorities to send the diapers to an incinerator or landfill than to Poyer's plant. But the recycling is "viable because the Welsh government wants a green economy," Poyer said. Read Full Story.

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PLANET

How The Philippines Built 500Km Of Bike Lanes In Less Than A Year

How The Philippines Built 500Km Of Bike Lanes In Less Than A Year

When public transport operations were suspended in Metro Manila, Philippines, due to the pandemic, radiology clerk April, who doesn't own a car, started riding her bike to the hospital. "I never thought of riding a bike to the hospital before," April recounted. "But when we healthcare workers didn't have the option to use public transport, I tried to pedal. At first, I was nervous, especially on major roads. But in the long run, we got used to it and became more confident." Scores of commuters who relied on public transport turned to cycling as well. And when mass services returned, many stuck with their bike. With the increase in bike pedestrians the government allocated more than 22 million dollars for active mobility infrastructure. Turning into the largest bike lane construction program in the country's history in less than a year. Read Full Story.

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