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Aug 10, 2022 Read in Browser

Karuna News

“Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.” -- Carl Sagan

Hello everyone!  Big thank you to our scientists! Through their dedication, experimentation and hard work, new technologies are developed, problems are solved and we discover much needed answers. Among this week’s stories, we highlight the brilliance of science channeled in the spirit of service: conjoined twins are separated, new glasses allow deaf people to ‘read’ speech, and a mobile dental unit is created. Hope you have a good week and that you find inspiration in the many acts of courageous kindness we are seeing in our world at this time!

EVERYDAY HEROES

Young Engineer In Gaza Creates Mobile Dental Unit

Young Engineer In Gaza Creates Mobile Dental Unit

A young engineering graduate in Gaza has created a mobile dental unit to allow dentists to treat elderly and special needs patients in their homes. Abdullah Al-Baba came up with the idea after his paralyzed father, who had been injured during a weekly march in Gaza, needed to go to the dentist. He created the mobile unit after realizing that dental clinics are usually on the upper floors of building, that there are no dental clinics at all in the eastern part of the Gaza strip, and that some people need treatment late at night, when regular dental clinics are not open. Now with the mobile unit, dentists can treat people any time, anywhere, he says. The unit, which fits in a suitcase, has all the instruments and tools a dentist needs. Read Full Story.

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NEWS

Surgeons Use Virtual Reality To Separate Conjoined Twins

Surgeons Use Virtual Reality To Separate Conjoined Twins

Gemini Untwined

It is 'man-on-Mars stuff', says neurosurgeon Noor ul Owase Jeelani. He is talking about how medical teams in England and Brazil used virtual reality to separate two conjoined Brazilian twin brothers in Rio de Janeiro in June. Arthur and Bernardo Lima were born with fused skulls and intertwined brains. Rio's Instituto Estadual do Cérebro Paulo Niemeyer worked with London-based Jeelani at Great Ormond Street Hospital to create 3D and virtual reality models of the twins' brains. The teams then conducted a cross-continental "trial surgery" using virtual reality before performing seven surgeries to fully separate the twins, involving hours of operating time and nearly 100 medical staff. After six months of rehabilitation, Arthur and Bernardo will soon celebrate their fourth birthday, finally able to see each other face to face. The Brazilian hospital will continue to work with the British charity Gemini Untwined to treat other rare cases of conjoined twins in South America. Read Full Story.

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TECHNOLOGY

New AR Glasses Allow Deaf People To 'See' Conversations By Turning Audio Into Subtitles

New AR Glasses Allow Deaf People To 'See' Conversations By Turning Audio Into Subtitles

While with his family over Christmas in December 2021, Dan Scarfe noticed his 97-year-old hearing impaired grandfather struggled to follow conversations in real time. "It's got to the point now where he literally just sits in silence," Scarfe described to Euronews." I thought, well, hang on a second. He watches TV all the time with subtitles. Why can't we subtitle the world?" From that spark of an idea, Scarfe assembled a company to develop AR (augmented reality) glasses. The glasses have a microphone that takes in audio from the environment and sends it to a connected mobile phone. The phone then creates closed captions from that audio, and with Nreal software, projects the subtitles into the world. The conversation data, Scarfe asserts, would be fully owned by the user, and only be stored on the user's personal devices, as opposed to in a cloud. Scarfe's company, XRAI Glass, launched its service for the first time, to 100 beta testers on July 29, 2022. Read Full Story.

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ARTS

520-Foot-Long Bridge Is Actually A Flood-Proof Museum

520-Foot-Long Bridge Is Actually A Flood-Proof Museum

Roy Gardiner | Kerstin Thompson Architects

As climate change intensifies extreme weather, floods are becoming more frequent and more severe. This has produced a wild variety of flood-proof structures, from floating office buildings that can rise and fall with the tide to structures that function as dams. In Australia, one architecture firm came up with an even bolder concept: putting a building on a bridge. Located in a rural part of the country's southeastern coast, the $20 million Bundanon Art Museum is split across two buildings designed by Kerstin Thompson Architects. The first is built into a hill to protect it from bush fires that often ravage the region. The second doubles as a 520-foot-long bridge that stretches over a flood-prone gully. Habitable bridges were a frequent sight in the Renaissance, and if this new building is any indication, then such bridges may still play an important role in the contemporary world. "We could have come into this site, raised it, and flattened it with earth-moving equipment, and that would have destroyed the place. It is a unique concept to think of a building as a bridge, but that's a bit of a leap we made," said Lloyd McCathie, a project architect. Read Full Story.

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SPORTS

All-Female Team Breaks Record Rowing To Hawaii

All-Female Team Breaks Record Rowing To Hawaii

Lat 35

As part of the Great Pacific Race, teams of four row 2,400 nautical miles from San Francisco to Hawaii. On July 26, 2022, four women broke record books, becoming the fastest all-female team to complete that distance, clocking it in 34 days, 14 hours, and 11 minutes. Rowing in 2-hour shifts, averaging 90 minutes of sleep at a time, Libby Costello, Sophia Denison Johnston, Brooke Downes and Adrienne Smith of the Lat 35 women's team endured rough waters, ate freeze-dried meals, had moments of sea-sickness and exhaustion along the way. But they never lost sight of their mission to break barriers, with a large following on social media lifting their sails, and the journey also raising money for the Anxiety and Depression Association of America. Pushing through hard times is not just for rowers, they say. Team member Brooke Downes stated, "These women are so incredible, but we're not superhuman. There's nothing that we were born with that make us any different than anybody else." Read Full Story.

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