Karuna can spread faster than Corona.
Aug 31, 2022 Read in Browser

Karuna News

"People working together in a strong community with a shared goal and a common purpose can make the impossible possible." --Tom Vilsack
 
There is a special beauty and power that comes from cooperation. Inherent in its design is the capacity of individuals to come together to serve a common good. Among our stories this week we learn about Indigenous Peoples in Ecuador working with the Government to protect the rainforest and Apps that are designed to resell unused food. And in Brazil, how a city and local favelas (shanty towns) are building the world’s largest urban garden. May these stories invite us into a more expansive space and allow us to hold the challenges of these days with uncommon grace. Wishing you a good week!

EVERYDAY HEROES

NYC Uber Driver Stops Mid-Ride To Rescue People From Burning Building

NYC Uber Driver Stops Mid-Ride To Rescue People From Burning Building

Fritz Sam, 54, began his day driving Uber in New York City. At 8 a.m. he picked up a passenger, Jemimah James Wei, 29, who was headed to the airport for a 10 a.m. flight. Five minutes into the ride, they pass a bock with some activity outside. Coming closer, they realized the brownstone building was completely engulfed in flames. Checking with Wei if they could stop to help (to which she replied "Obviously!") they darted towards the building. A crowd had formed outside, shards of glass and flames were shooting out of the building. Sam asked if anyone was inside. No one knew. He gave a stranger his cell phone and darted in without a thought. "Everybody get out! Fire!" he shouted. He guided two separate residents out, even telling one who seemed shocked and reluctant to evacuate, "If you're not going, I'm not going." "It was an act of pure good-heartedness," Wei, who somehow made her flight, said of Sam. Inspired, she quickly posted on Twitter. By the time she landed in Vermont her tweet had gone viral. Humbled by the praise, Sam, said he simply did what he felt he had to do. "Anybody could do this." A father of two, he adds, "If it was my family, and I wasn't able to be there, I would hope that somebody else would go in and help them." Read Full Story.

FB    TW    IN

SCHOOLS

How An Author Got To Thank The Childhood Teacher Who Taught Him English

How An Author Got To Thank The Childhood Teacher Who Taught Him English

When Jamil Jan Kochai, now 30, entered second grade, he was terrified. Emigrating to the U.S. from Pakistan when he was just a toddler, Kochai's family spoke Pashto and Farsi at home. In kindergarten, he didn't know a word of English. "I associated language and learning with punishment, fear and disappointment," he recalls. But his second-grade teacher, Mrs. Lung, changed all that. Nearly everyday after school Lung sat with Kochai, warmly teaching him how to read and write. "She showed me that I didn't have to be afraid of it, and it could actually be something that I could come to love," he told "The Washington Post". By the end of that year, Kochai was fluent, and the next year, he won a reading comprehension award. Today, Kochai has published two books and teaches creative writing at multiple universities. He always felt grateful for Lung, but couldn't recall her first name to be able to trace contact to her. But in 2019, Lung was at a medical appointment and the doctor surprised her by asking, "Are you the Mrs. Lung that taught Jamil Jan Kochai?" Kochai had written an article online that recalled his generous teacher. On August 13, 2022, Lung and her husband attended a book reading by Kochai. "When I saw Mrs. Lung there, my heart dropped," Kochai said. "It wasn't like seeing someone from my past, it was like seeing someone that I've known and cared for and loved all my life." Read Full Story.

FB    TW    IN

ENVIRONMENT

Indigenous People And Government Work To Protect Rainforest In Ecuador

Indigenous People And Government Work To Protect Rainforest In Ecuador

ZEBULON72 | Pixabay

Across the world, indigenous and local communities inhabit nearly a quarter of the land, and because of this directly affect 80 percent of global biodiversity. As such, they are an integral part in resolving against climate change. Yet they are oftentimes overlooked by governments. But in Ecuador, for the first time in its history, local governments in the Pastaza region are actively seeking the involvement of indigenous people and prioritizing their needs in forest conservation efforts. The joint collaboration not only focuses on reducing deforestation in the region, it also aims to empower local people, helping them secure food and income through sustainable production practices. Bruno Paladines, Mosaic Coordinator at the Nature and Culture International (NCI) says, "We believe Indigenous people are the ones who can best conserve these areas using their ancestral knowledge and their own vision of governance and land management." There are also plans for conserving indigenous handicrafts and languages, as well as improving river transportation and internet access for the people who live there. Read Full Story.

FB    TW    IN

COMMUNITY

Brazil Set To Build The World's Biggest Urban Garden By 2024

Brazil Set To Build The World's Biggest Urban Garden By 2024

Julio Cesar Barros

Brazil's city of Rio de Janeiro is working with local favelas to build a giant urban garden the size of 15 soccer fields. This year, it's estimated that the 56 gardens that compose the government-funded "Hortas Cariocas" project will produce 80 tons of food. When the project is completed and fully operational in 2024, production is expected to double. So far, 400-500 garden beds have already been built, and there are 38 gardeners working at its Madureira Park on a weekly basis. Half the harvested produce is donated to local community and residents, and the other half is sold by gardeners at affordable prices. In addition to alleviating food security (33 million Brazilians currently face hunger), the gardens also nurtures the community. The gardens sit in an area that was once a hotbed for drug consumption. "Before, you would open your door and see the 'crackland'. Today, you open your door and see a garden" states Julio Cesar Barros, founder of the initiative and director of agroecology organic gardening for Rio de Janeiro's municipal environment agency. Barros is optimistic the project will encourage urban sustainability and healthier lifestyles. Read Full Story.

FB    TW    IN

BUSINESS

Apps Turn Unused Food Into Affordable Meals

Apps Turn Unused Food Into Affordable Meals

treatsure

Every year, about one-third of food is lost or wasted, globally. According to the United Nations, this contributes to about 8-10% of greenhouse gas emissions like methane. In the face of that, tech startups worldwide are designing apps that resell unused food through mobile phone apps. Singapore's treatsure app turns unused luxury hotel meals into "buffet-in-a-box" offerings. They estimate that 30 metric tons of food has been rescued since it launched in 2017. "A common mantra that I have is that being sustainable should be attainable," Preston Wong, treatsure's CEO and co-founder, told Bloomberg. In Hong Kong, the app, Phenix by OnTheList, has sold 25,000 discounted "Mystery Baskets" of food from stores. The app, which launched in France in 2014, estimates that 150 million meals have been preserved. Another app, Too Good To Go, which launched in Denmark and operates in 17 countries across North America and Europe has provided over 152 million meals through its "Magic Bags" of rescued food. Read Full Story.

FB    TW    IN

SHARE THE KARUNA

It always feels good to spread the love. :)

Click to Share

Or simply pass on this link:
karunavirus.org/news/?nid=127

FB     TW     IN

Visit KarunaNews website for a keyword enabled, searchable listing of 5777 stories in our archive. You can also create your favorites list, like this. :)

Hungry for more? Sign up for Daily Karuna.

Offered by Karuna volunteers. They won't mind if you send them an elbow bump. :)

ABOUT // LATEST // VOLUNTEER

Update your email preferences or unsubscribe here.

A volunteer-run project of ServiceSpace.