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Sep 7, 2022 Read in Browser

Karuna News

“No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted.” -- Aesop

Hello everyone! In this week’s issue, we share uplifting stories and courageous acts of love; students that find a way to give their devoted teacher a much needed car, a community comes together to fix a flooded home, and a doctor visits his patients by horseback. There are so many good things happening in our world! Kind acts create new possibilities for others. May we step into our highest aspiration and, in our own way, serve this time in history. Wishing you a good and healthy week!

YOUTH

Selfless Teacher Receives An Extraordinary Gift From Grateful Students

Selfless Teacher Receives An Extraordinary Gift From Grateful Students

kaboompics | Pixabay

Students at YULA Boys High School in Los Angeles, California, surprised their math teacher, Julio Castro, with a special gift: a 2019 Mazda. Mr. Castro, who was car-less, commuted four hours a day to work, leaving home at 4:30am and returning at 9:30pm after his three young children have already gone to bed. Reflecting on Mr. Castro's devotion to students despite the long commute, YULA student Joshua Gerendash said, "He'll skip his lunch break to help a student and stay after school. He also helps students who aren't in his classes. He's really, really, really devoted to our futures." As a gesture of their gratitude and appreciation, YULA students used social media to help fundraise $30,000 to purchase a car for Mr. Castro. Mr. Castro, who was born in Peru and is the first person in his family to attend college, felt very grateful and fortunate given that other family members are facing greater hardships. In response to his students' gift, he said, "YULA opened the doors for me, they accepted me as a family member," he said. "And you can't buy that. I want to be here." Read Full Story.

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COMMUNITY

A Contractor Stole Their Money. The Community Rallied To Fix Their Flooded Home.

A Contractor Stole Their Money. The Community Rallied To Fix Their Flooded Home.

Karl Solano | Unsplash

Jaylan Gray's mother died two years ago, leaving him alone in their Texas, US, house with this little brother Julian, then age 10. "Before she died, she told me not to sell the house," said Gray, 22. "My mom and my stepdad had paid it off and she wanted us to live in it." Then, last year, disaster struck at their house near Houston, when the pipes burst in a massive winter storm. The house was flooded from the attic, soaking and ruining ceilings, walls and floors; Gray hired a contractor to make repairs, but the contractor punched holes in the walls throughout the house, then disappeared with about $20,000, reported "The Washington Post". Gray didn't have the resources to pursue the matter; he and his little brother moved across town to live with their grandmother. But Julian had to change schools and they both wanted to return to the home they had lived in with their parents. The next spring, community nonprofit Katy Responds got involved to repair the home for the brothers. Volunteers repaired the home's floor, hauled away ruined furniture and flooring, put up new drywall, and re-wired, plumbed, and painted the entire house; a local church donated new furnishings. "What they did for us is so much more than I ever imagined. My goodness, I was blown away. Everybody was so kind to us – they went above and beyond," said Gray. Read Full Story.

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EVERYDAY HEROES

On Call With Italy's Horseback Doctor

On Call With Italy's Horseback Doctor

Dr. Roberto Anfosso is an Italian doctor who makes his home visits on the back of his horse, Ambra. He and his horse see 15-20 patients per week, riding for up to 100 km or 62 miles in Piedmont, Italy. An avid soccer player in his youth, when severe asthma limited his ability to run, he vowed to find a sport where someone else could run for him; horseback riding met that criteria. Although he dreamed of working with this horse one day, he only realized this possibility by accident. One day, Dr. Anfosso was out for a ride and he got an urgent medical call -- so he went -- on horseback. The patient was quite surprised, but the idea of doing his rounds on horseback was a winning idea for the doctor and his patients. Dr. Anfosso views his horse as a form of therapy for his patients. Elderly people are often fixated with their illnesses; the horse is a distraction for them. And as for him, as a horseback doctor he is living the old adage, "Choose a job you love and you'll never work a day in your life." Read Full Story.

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ENVIRONMENT

World's First 100% Hydrogen-Powered Train Enters Passenger Service In Germany

World's First 100% Hydrogen-Powered Train Enters Passenger Service In Germany

Alstom

French-based company Alstom has announced that the world's first hydrogen train, the Coradia iLint, reached another historic milestone in Germany. A bunch of these hydrogen fuel-cell trains have now entered passenger service along a 100% hydrogen train route in the country's Lower Saxony area. The use of hydrogen as a fuel for trains noticeable reduces the burden on the environment. The Coradia iLint trains will gradually replace 15 diesel trains serving in the region. With a range of 2,000 km (around 620 miles), the Coradia iLint model can run all day on just one tank of hydrogen. This emissions-free regional train emits only steam and condensed water while operating at a low level of noise. "Emission-free mobility is one of the most important goals for ensuring a sustainable future, and Alstom has a clear ambition to become the world leader in alternative propulsion systems for rail. The world's first hydrogen train, the Coradia iLint, demonstrates our clear commitment to green mobility combined with state-of-the-art technology," said Henri Poupart-Lafarge, CEO and Chairman of the Board of Alstom. Read Full Story.

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NEWS

First Cruise Ship For 1,000 Refugees To Come In Amsterdam

First Cruise Ship For 1,000 Refugees To Come In Amsterdam

Azhar J | Unsplash

Amsterdam is making emergency accommodations for at least 1,000 refugees available on a cruise ship in the Westelijk Havengebied area. In a press release, the city said the action would relieve pressure on Ter Apel, where scenes of asylum seekers sleeping outside in unsanitary and 'inhumane' conditions have travelled around the world. Refugees will be able to stay on the ship for at least six months, starting in October, and possibly for longer. Deputy mayor Rutger Groot Wassink, responsible for social affairs and refugees in Amsterdam, said, "The situation in Ter Apel is heartbreaking. Together we need to solve the lack of asylum locations so that refugees can find a place…The shelter on the cruise ship is only a short-term solution. It is important that the national government and municipalities reform the broken asylum chain so that these kind of emergency situations are not needed in the future." Read Full Story.

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