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Sep 21, 2022 Read in Browser

Karuna News

“What you do makes a difference, and you have to decide what kind of difference you want to make.” -- Dr. Jane Goodall

Hello everyone! This week's uplifting and inspiring stories amplify the voice of our collective love and creativity. A football team gathers to build a bridge that was washed out, a large international company puts people and planet first, and artists in Ireland receive monthly income that gives them practical support during this challenging time. Everyday, people are choosing love over fear and bringing new possibilities for our future. May you be inspired by all the good that is happening and have a creative and expansive week!

ARTS

Irish Government Begins Paying 2,000 Artists A Weekly Income

Irish Government Begins Paying 2,000 Artists A Weekly Income

Clem Onojeghuo | Unsplash

Ireland's government has begun to pay 2,000 artists a weekly income of 325 euros ($325). During the coronavirus pandemic, venues for the arts were shut down for long stretches, deeply impacting artists' income. In response, Catherine Martin -- Ireland's Minister for Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sports and Media -- put together a taskforce to explore how the arts could recover from the "unprecedented damage" caused by the pandemic, and from that group, the Basic Income for the Arts scheme, which will run 3 years at the cost of €25 million, was born. Recipients include over 700 visual artists, 584 musicians, 204 people working in film, 184 writers, around 170 actors, 32 dancers and choreographers, 13 circus artists, and 10 architects. All of them will also take part in a research study that will collect data on the impact of the payment. Demand for the pilot was high: over 9,000 people applied and 2,000 recipients were selected randomly and anonymously. Martin remarked that the pilot program has the "potential to fundamentally transform how we support the arts and creativity". Read Full Story.

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BUSINESS

'Earth Is Now Our Only Shareholder', Says Patagonia Founder

'Earth Is Now Our Only Shareholder',  Says Patagonia Founder

Malik Skydsgaard | Pexels

Outdoor gear company Patagonia says "the earth is now our only shareholder" now that the company's ownership has been transferred from founder Yvon Chouinard and his family to two nonprofits that will fight climate change. Patagonia will transfer 100% of its voting stock to the Patagonia Purpose Trust and all of its nonvoting stock to the nonprofit Holdfast Collective. Patagonia estimates that after reinvesting some profits back into the company, Holdfast will get $100 million annually as a dividend. Chouinard said options such as selling the company and donating the proceeds; or taking the company public, did not meet its ultimate goals. "Instead of extracting value from nature and transforming it into wealth for investors, we'll use the wealth Patagonia creates to protect the source of all wealth," he said. Patagonia CEO Ryan Gellert hopes this inspires "a new way of doing business that puts people and planet first." Read Full Story.

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YOUTH

Toronto Boy Touched By Kindness Of Strangers After Scone Stand Is Stolen

Toronto Boy Touched By Kindness Of Strangers After Scone Stand Is Stolen

David Hove via Washington Post

David Hove is back in business, after his scone stand was stolen from outside his home while he was taking a bathroom break. The thief left only the paper sign advertising 'homemade lemon cranberry scones'. David and his older sister, Kimberly, started The Hove Delights to raise money for a cellphone for her and an X-box for him, using a wicker table that a cousin had gifted to their parents to set out their baked goods. After CTV News Toronto aired the story, the 10-year-old Toronto boy was overwhelmed by the kindness of strangers -- and 70 or so orders received from all over the world, which they are now trying to meet. Neighbors David Ricci and Elizabeth Aiello bought a new table and cooler, and Tim Byrne travelled from Barrie to give David an Xbox gaming system. The siblings turned down offers of donations, saying they wanted to earn their money. His children have learned a valuable lesson, says their father, also named David -- that there are more good people than bad in the world. Read Full Story.

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COMMUNITY

Taking Back São Paulo's Streets, One Sunday At A Time

Taking Back São Paulo's Streets, One Sunday At A Time

Wilfredor | Wikimedia Commons

When the mayor of São Paulo, a Brazilian megalopolis of over 12 million, decided in 2016 to close the city's most famous avenue to cars on Sundays, many residents and business owners weren't happy. But nowadays, most city residents think the Paulista Aberta program should be expanded to other major streets, and store managers hope the ban can be expanded to other days of the week. "With the closing for cars, people started to walk a lot more, to stroll around, and the sales on Sundays grew sevenfold," says Erivan Soares, manager of Martins Fontes, a large bookstore. "Sundays are now, by far, our busiest days." Since the 1890s, the street has gone through the era of mansions, the era of buildings and the era of corporations; now it is the era of people, says a local historian. It has become a cultural hub and the city's main tourist attraction seven days a week. Several new cultural centers or museums have opened since 2016, and on average, 43 cultural activities take place every Sunday. Read Full Story.

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COMMUNITY

Flooding Destroys Bridge In Indiana, School Football Team Rebuilds It

Flooding Destroys Bridge In Indiana, School Football Team Rebuilds It

Ryan Jesop | Washington Post

The only bridge leading from Todd Hagan and his wife's house in Indiana was destroyed in a flash flood caused by a downpour of eight inches of rain. With no access to the main road, they were left stranded. Jesop, an eighth-grade teacher at Switzerland County Middle School, after hearing of the situation, called together his middle school football team to help the family. Many of the boys brought along their parents, siblings, and other members of the community. When they showed up on a Labor Day morning, Hagan was left speechless. "Tears were coming out of our eyes," he said. Wooden planks covering the 60-foot bridge, which were caked with mud, all had to be replaced. Fresh lumber was sawed and fitted onto the steel frame. A job that would have taken the Haganses several weeks was completed in a few hours. "There was a team atmosphere with our parents," said one player. "It felt like it brought us together even more." Read Full Story.

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