Karuna can spread faster than Corona.
Oct 19, 2022 Read in Browser

Karuna News

“Community is the foundation to success.” --Kristin Jones
 
Hello everyone! When people come together as a community to contribute to the quality of others' lives, it’s remarkable what is created and what a difference it can make. This week, we learn about twenty and thirty year-olds restoring homes in Ukraine, ‘edible parks’ helping to deal with food shortages, and different faiths coming together at a hummus championship to recognize peace. They all invite us to a more expansive space and remind us of what is possible through creativity, innovation, and love. Wishing you well and thank you for being part of our community!
 

COMMUNITY

'We Take Care Of Each Other': The Young Ukrainians Rebuilding More Than Just Homes

'We Take Care Of Each Other': The Young Ukrainians Rebuilding More Than Just Homes

Christopher Cherry | The Guardian

Before the war, young people "would never come to these villages [outside the city], but now we all take care of each other," states Tetiana Burianov, a community organizer spearheading a band of 20 and 30-something volunteers in restoring homes and areas in rural villages outside Kyiv, an initiative now known as Repair Together. What began as a low-key effort over the summer has burgeoned into a crew of 200 urban volunteers arriving in villages every weekend to clean up the rubble and devastation. On a warm Saturday, 86-year-old Liubov Pavlivna's damaged home is bustling with volunteer work crews. Their kindness is a stark and welcome contrast to the brutality of war Pavlivna faced, where her disabled son was killed by the Russian occupation, and she herself had been threatened by soldiers and thrown in a ditch. Oleksii Oleksiiovych, 63, and his wife lost everything in seconds during a tank battle in mid-March that smashed his house to the ground. Having moved in with friends after losing everything they earned over their lifetimes, any clean-up had been minimal for months -- until now. "I want to thank the volunteers. I want to fall on my knees," Oleksiiovych uttered. Read Full Story.

FB    TW    IN

ARTS

'Kindness At The Center': Art Makes Hospital Visits Less Painful

'Kindness At The Center': Art Makes Hospital Visits Less Painful

Jooney Woodward | The Observer

It was June 2019 when Mina Holland first saw Snow Fox, a ward for regular pediatric outpatients at Evelina London Children's Hospital. Her three-month-old daughter had been admitted to their local hospital three weeks earlier and it was depressing to be in a ward whose bare walls bore peeling paint. But at Snow Fox, with its warm lighting, bright colors and upbeat design, Mina felt calm and confidence. Bringing this kind of empathy is the point, agrees Louisa Williams, who set up Art In Site in 2003. "We talk about the building being part of the care team, and art and design as an extension of the bedside manner..." Art In Site was commissioned by Liz O'Sullivan, arts manager for the Guy's and St Thomas' Trust. "Kindness sits at the center of it all, and the uplift it brings carries a greater value than the price tag," she says. While some of their hardest moments have been spent in Snow Fox, "It's no longer the place that causes her pain but the place that keeps her well -- and our family in one piece," Holland says. Read Full Story.

FB    TW    IN

ENVIRONMENT

Edible Parks Are Spreading In Cities Across The Globe

Edible Parks Are Spreading In Cities Across The Globe

Dan Burton | Unsplash

A number of cities around the world are turning public lands into edible orchards and gardens where anyone can help themselves to fresh fruits and vegetables free of charge. Funded by the European Commission, the Edible Cities Network is supporting approximately 150 cities worldwide in their efforts to grow food in urban landscapes. Many of these cities have transformed public spaces, including parks and blank hillsides, into urban ecosystems where food can grow and be harvested for use by local residents. In Asheville, North Carolina, for instance, the Dr. George Washington Carver Edible Park has over 40 varieties of fruit and nut trees from which residents can pick and take whatever they need. "Anyone can get whatever they want, when they want it," said Lynx Bergdahl from Bountiful Cities, a nonprofit that helps manage the edible park in Asheville. "This is about taking away as many barriers as possible to create public food access, whether somebody wants a single apple or an entire basket." In response to concerns over people taking more than they need, organizers of Edible Cities Network projects have not found that to be an issue at all; instead, they report that there is always more than enough for everyone. Read Full Story.

FB    TW    IN

RESOURCES

Ancient AC System Cools Houses Without Electricity

Ancient AC System Cools Houses Without Electricity

Yael Issacharov

The Nave Air Conditioning system can cool a room without power. Israeli designer Yael Issacharov was inspired by the "'jarrah"', a traditional Palestinian terra-cotta drinking water container that is hung in a room to cool the water and the living space itself. This clay is full of small pores, from which water filters very slowly, evaporating using the heat in the water. That heat, transferred to the air, makes the water progressively cooler. She wanted to integrate this cooling phenomenon within the building itself. Inspired by architect Hassan Fathy, who brought traditional adobe and mud building methods back to modern Egyptian architecture, Issacharov turned the jara into active walls. Its building block is a terra-cotta tile made of hollow tubes, resembling a piece of woven chain mail or fabric. The intricate design is filled with water which cools as it slowly evaporates, and the room temperature drops as the wall itself cools. The Nave could be a perfect solution for towns in any desert areas, from Texas to Iran, Issacharov says. Read Full Story.

FB    TW    IN

COMMUNITY

Brazilian Jews And Arabs Hold Hummus Championship To Celebrate Peaceful Co-existence

Brazilian Jews And Arabs Hold Hummus Championship To Celebrate Peaceful Co-existence

Hebraica Sao Paulo

Brazilian Jews, Christians and Muslims celebrated their peaceful coexistence in Latin America's largest nation with a competition centered on one of the Middle East's signature foods. About 150 people attended the inaugural Abrahamic Hummus Championship, timed to the International Day of Peace, which was organized by the Hebraica Jewish club in Sao Paulo. Brazil is home to nearly 10 million people of Arab descent, the largest such population in the Americas, while over 100,000 Jews call Brazil home, including around 60,000 in Sao Paulo. Team Sahtein, composed of three Christian Arab women, won technically, while a group of Christian Arab men won the popular vote. Both teams represented the Mount Lebanon club of Sao Paulo. "It is an incredible chance to exchange ideas, experiences, and contacts. Together, making hummus, making peace, making a better future," said organizer Ariel Krok. Read Full Story.

FB    TW    IN

SHARE THE KARUNA

It always feels good to spread the love. :)

Click to Share

Or simply pass on this link:
karunavirus.org/news/?nid=134

FB     TW     IN

Visit KarunaNews website for a keyword enabled, searchable listing of 6018 stories in our archive. You can also create your favorites list, like this. :)

Hungry for more? Sign up for Daily Karuna.

Offered by Karuna volunteers. They won't mind if you send them an elbow bump. :)

ABOUT // LATEST // VOLUNTEER

Update your email preferences or unsubscribe here.

A volunteer-run project of ServiceSpace.