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Nov 16, 2022 Read in Browser

Karuna News

"As long as you're breathing, it's never too late to do some good." --Maya Angelou

One of the beautiful things about life is that it's never too late to offer a little more love in the world. This week, we look at examples of everyday heroes who follow whispers of the heart to make the world a bit brighter for those around them. From a music producer who unearths his 95-year-old grandmother's tremendous talent; to a plumber's shining integrity; refugees building bridges through games of soccer; and communities whose spontaneous goodwill saves lives of humans and dolphins alike -- we are reminded again and again that there is always a deeper potential with us, ready to blossom, when we tune into our shared humanity. May your week ahead be filled with that potential!

ARTS

95-Year-Old Grandmother Nabs Latin Grammy Best New Artist Nomination

95-Year-Old Grandmother Nabs Latin Grammy Best New Artist Nomination

Couleur | Pixabay

A native of Cuba, Angela Alvarez grew up loving to sing and play piano from her two aunts, later picking up guitar. Music went on the back burner after her father said it would not be a suitable life. Keeping the dreams in the back of her mind, music kept her afloat through life: from motherhood to the Cuban Revolution and to later losing her husband and only daughter. When Alvarez became a grandmother, however, it all came back to her. Her grandson, Carlos José Alvarez, wanted to keep her musical legacy alive. What started as a family project became a documentary, full-fledged album, and even a Latin Grammy nomination for best artist. Alvarez, now at 95-years-old, estimates that has written about 50 songs over her lifetime. "I think that music is the language of the soul," she says. Her 15-track debut album was released on June 2021 titled "Angela Alvarez." Read Full Story.

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EVERYDAY HEROES

Plumber-led Support Network Keeping People Warm This Winter

Plumber-led Support Network Keeping People Warm This Winter

Steve Buissinne | Pixabay

Based in Burnley, England, the Disability and Elderly Plumbing and Heating Emergency Repair (Depher) is helping over 19,000 with plumbing repairs for free. The support network provides aid to low-income communities who are susceptible to rogue traders. And with the costs of living skyrocketing and winter looming, such services have become a lifeline for such communities. "Whatever a family or someone in a vulnerable situation needs, if they can't find help elsewhere they turn to us for a solution," says Anderson. James Anderson, founder of Depher, funds the service with his paying jobs and donations from utility companies. Anderson is expanding the network's services to include a welfare fund to help pay for electricity and gas bills. Read Full Story.

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COMMUNITY

One South African Community Created Its Own Ambulance Service

One South African Community Created Its Own Ambulance Service

Hout Bay Volunteer EMS | Facebook

Community-based ambulance services may improve response times and support established healthcare systems, as suggested by the volunteer community-based ambulance service in Cape Town's Hout Bay suburb started by residents in 1994. The Hout Bay Volunteer Emergency Medical Service had an average response time within its own area that was 42.3% faster than the Western Cape government's emergency medical services. It operates with one sponsored ambulance staffed by at least two volunteers. The service interacts regularly with community leaders, offers community first aid training, facilitates fire prevention training, visits schools and provides medical support at community events. Its longevity suggests that the model is sustainable and provides valuable lessons for other communities in South Africa. Read Full Story.

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SPORTS

A Sporting Chance For Rohingya Refugees

A Sporting Chance For Rohingya Refugees

Virgil Cayasa | Unsplash

"Most people, when they read about the Rohingya in newspapers, they only see faceless victims who have fled genocide in Myanmar," describes Sabber Kyaw Min, founder of Rohingya Human Rights Initiative who also started the Rohingya Football Club India with fellow refugee Ali Johar. Fleeing genocide, Sabber Kyaw Min fled to Bangladesh and walked across the border to India in 2005. "After all these years in India, I still do not feel like I belong," he describes. But "I felt at home on the field, and I saw that the men I was playing felt it, too." In 2017, Min and his friend Johar convened friends and raised funds for jerseys and equipment to form the Rohingya Football Club. Since then, eight teams among Rohingya youth aged 15 to 23 have formed across India's cities of Delhi, Hyderabad, Haryana, Jammu, and Kashmir. While the teams face constant challenges given team members' unstable situations, limited work options, school, as well as far fewer opportunities for females, the unifying thread in their passion for the sport is a joyous light amid the tumultuous refugee journey. It's the best way for young players to feel 'normal' under these circumstances," Min says. "For me, football isn't just a game, it's medicine." Read Full Story.

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ENVIRONMENT

A Pod Of Dolphins Got Stuck In The Mud At Low Tide -- Here's How A Community Saved Them

A Pod Of Dolphins Got Stuck In The Mud At Low Tide -- Here's How A Community Saved Them

TJ Fitzsimmons | Unsplash

On a recent Friday afternoon, dozens of people in Digby, Nova Scotia, Canada, rallied to save a stranded pod of Atlantic white-sided dolphins that has become stuck when the tide went out. Linda Groocock spotted the group of dolphins through binoculars; at first she enjoyed watching them swim, but soon realized they were in trouble. "The tide's going out and more and more are starting to beach because…those Bay of Fundy tides are quite something," she said. She put out a call for help, and it came. Digby's volunteer fire department, staff from the Department of Fisheries, and young people from Digby Regional High School all answered the call. The fisheries staff showed everyone what to do; mud was packed around the dolphins to keep them on their bellies and their blowholes were kept clear with soaked towels. The group of about 40 people was able to get some smaller dolphins onto tarps and sleds and pull them into deeper water. When the tide came back in, all dolphins returned to the sea. "We are so very fortunate in the Maritime provinces to have people in our communities who care about these animals, who care about the oceans. And when the need is there…people answer the call," said Tonya Wimmer, executive director of the Maritime Response Group. Read Full Story.

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